Make a Good Impression by Showing Some #DonorLove

4810189_15c7e30d55_zNot long ago while I was scrolling through my email, one message stood out. It was a thank you video from a nonprofit organization. A week or so before that I received a thank you card from another nonprofit.

Unfortunately, those are the only examples of #DonorLove from the last few weeks that I can share with you. I’d also like to tell you I received a bunch of wonderful thank yous after I made my year-end gifts, but I can’t. Most of them were automatically generated thank you emails or the usual boring form letter.

We can do better!

I don’t know where your organization stands, but if you’re like many, you’re sleepwalking through your #DonorLove practice. Thanking your donors is not a we do this after we receive a donation and then we don’t have to do anything situation. 

#DonorLove is something you need to show all year-round and with Valentine’s Day coming up, it’s a perfect opportunity to thank your donors and show how much you appreciate their support.

8 Strategies to Celebrate Nonprofit Donors on Valentine’s Day

Happy Valentine’s Day: Donor Love Infographic

Maybe you would rather not go the Valentine’s Day route, but you should still do something to show appreciation this month (and every month). The holidays are over and February can be a dreary month. Your donors would appreciate a little mood booster.

This is also a good opportunity to keep in touch with the people who gave to your year-end appeal, especially first-time donors. If you haven’t shown any #DonorLove since your year-end appeal, don’t wait much longer.

Here are a few ways you can show some #DonorLove.

Create a thank you photo

Make your donor’s day with a great photo, like this.

Image result for pictures of people holding thank you signs

You can send thank you photos via email and social media, use one to create a card, and include one on your thank you landing page.

Make a video

Videos are becoming an increasingly popular way to connect. Here’s a link to the thank you video I recently received. 

Thanks to our compassionate community!

It’s simple, yet effective, so don’t worry if you weren’t a film major. It’s not too hard to create a video.

How to Create a Donor Thank You Video

One idea for your video is to show a bunch of people saying thank you. You’ll want your video to be short, donor-centered, and show your organization’s work up close and personal.

Your thank you landing page is a perfect place to put a video. This is your first opportunity to say thank you and most landing pages are just boring receipts. You can also put your thank you video on your website and share it by email and social media.

Nonprofit Thank You Video Script

A Thank You Video to Promote Donor Retention

Send a card

A handwritten note will also brighten your donor’s day. If you don’t have the budget to send cards to everyone, send them to your most valuable donors. These may not be the ones who give you the most money. Do you have donors who have supported your organization for more than three years? How about more than five years? These are your valuable donors. Don’t take them for granted.

That said, I do think you should make every effort to send a card to ALL your donors at least once a year. You can spread it out so you mail a certain number of cards each month, ensuring all your donors get one sometime in the year. I also think it’s nice to send something during times of the year when donors might least expect it, such as May or September.

Most organizations don’t send thank you cards, so you’ll stand out if you do.

Share an update or success story

In addition to saying thank you, share a brief update or success story. Emphasize how you couldn’t have helped someone without your donor’s support. For example –Thanks to you, Jeremy won’t go to bed hungry tonight.

Phrases like Thanks to you or Because of you should dominate your newsletters and updates.

Back to basics

Make this the year you do a better job of thanking your donors. Thank your donors right away and send a thank you note/letter or make a phone call. Electronic thank yous aren’t good enough.

Be personal and conversational when you thank your donors. Don’t use jargon or other language they won’t understand. Write from the heart, but be sincere. Give specific examples of how your donors are helping you make a difference.

Make thanking your donors a priority

I’m a big proponent of communicating by mail, even if it’s only a few times a year. It’s much more personal. Yet, many nonprofits are skittish about spending too much on mailing costs.

If your budget doesn’t allow you to mail handwritten cards, is there a way you can change that? You may be able to get a print shop to donate cards. You could also look for additional sources of unrestricted funding to cover cards and postage. Think of these as essential expenses.

Maybe you need a change of culture – a culture of gratitude. This comes from the top, but you also need to get your board, all staff, and volunteers invested and involved in thanking your donors. 

You can’t say thank you enough. Make a commitment to thank your donors at least once a month. Create a thank you plan to help you with this. Planning ahead and creating systems makes a difference.

Create a system for expressing gratitude

Keep thinking of ways to show some #DonorLove. Stand out and impress your donors. 

Nonprofit Donor Thank You’s: What are You Doing to Stand Out?

20 Engaging Ideas for Donation Thank You Letters

Thanking a Donor by Email: Best Practices and Examples

You don’t even need to wait for a holiday or special occasion. Just thank your donors because they’re amazing and you wouldn’t be able to make a difference without them.

Donor Relationships: 5 Challenges and How to Overcome Them

by Steven Shattuck

Donor relationship development is vital for your nonprofit’s retention rate and revenue consistency. Overcome the challenges of relationship building.

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Building donor relationships is one of the most important things your nonprofit can do in order to maintain a consistent revenue stream and fund your mission. This is because effective donor relationships lead to higher retention rates. 

However, there are some challenges that many nonprofits run into when it comes to building these relationships, and many organizations can’t seem to overcome the common roadblocks!

That’s why we’ve created this guide. We want to make sure nonprofits have no excuse to let donor relationships go to the wayside. Each of the challenges we’ve stated here is directly related to statistics compiled by Ann Green originating from Bloomerang Chief Scientist Adrian Sargeant and Fundraising Effectiveness Project research. These challenges and related statistics are as follows: 

  • Donor Dissatisfaction – 36% of lapsed donors leave because they thought other organizations were more deserving of their contribution. 
  • Limited Time for Personal Interactions – 9% of lapsed donors left because the organization didn’t leave a lasting impression on them.
  • Donors are Treated like ATMs – 54% of lapsed donors did so because they could no longer afford to contribute. 
  • Lack of Prioritization of Retention – The average donor retention rate after the first gift is 19%, while it’s 63% after the second donation. 
  • Limited Technology – 18% of lapsed donors did so due to poor communication strategies. 

Ready to dive a little deeper into the implication of these statistics and how your nonprofit can overcome these common challenges? Let’s get started. 

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1. Donor Dissatisfaction

36% of lapsed donors leave because they thought other organizations were more deserving of their contribution. 

These donors leave because they’re dissatisfied with your organization. This doesn’t mean that other organizations are truly more deserving, but that they give the impression of being so with their communication strategy. Therefore, to overcome this challenge, your nonprofit needs to show all of your supporters that your organization makes the biggest splash using their donation. 

This concept can be boiled down to a single word: impact. 

In order to show your donors the impact that they make toward your mission, consider the following strategies: 

  • Tell impact stories at every opportunity. You don’t have to wait for the annual report or gala to tell stories about who has benefited from your programs and services. Weave them into acknowledgments, appeals, and stewardship pieces. There’s no limit to the amount of good news you can send. 
  • Communicate project progress updates to your supporters. Supporters want to know that your organization is moving forward with your mission. Expressing progress on larger projects is a great way to show campaign donors (and those who may have contributed to another campaign) that your nonprofit is always moving forward. 
  • Acknowledge achievements made through past gifts. Don’t make long-term donors feel like they haven’t made a dent in the issue your nonprofit is trying to alleviate. While your mission may never be truly completed, this is about being more than just donor-centric. Donors should be recognized for the impact they’ve made even when they’re being asked to fund new initiatives.

As your nonprofit creates its communication strategy, be sure you’re taking intentional steps to tell your supporters about the impact they’ve made on your nonprofit. This will help ensure they’re satisfied with the choice they make to give. 

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2. Limited Time for Personal Interactions

9% of lapsed donors leave because they have no memory of supporting the nonprofit.

If a donor doesn’t remember giving to your nonprofit, this is much deeper than simply a memory problem. The issue is really that your nonprofit didn’t make an impression on that individual. 

Personalizing your communications with supporters shows that your organization wants to develop a relationship with them. 

Relationships are not one-sided. If your nonprofit is sending the same message to all of your supporters, you’re not making the effort to get to know them. Essentially, this implies the expectation that your supporters should do all of the work to get to know your nonprofit, but you won’t do the same for them. The challenge is that there’s not enough time to individually communicate with each and every donor. 

There are several ways you can overcome this challenge. Consider the following strategies: 

  • Segment your supporters. Segmentation is the tried and true strategy that allows your organization to address the individual interests of your supporters without sending individual emails to each one. Create donor segments based on commonalities in their donor profiles. Then, when it comes time to communicate, you can craft messages that specifically target recipients with those traits and commonalities. 
  • Include personal details in messages. With the best software, your nonprofit should be able to autofill personal details like your supporters’ preferred name, past donation amount, past campaigns supported, and more. Bloomerang’s guide to nonprofit CRM software explains how personalization leads to donor cultivation and larger donations over time. 
  • Conduct research before interacting with major donors. Before your staff members go to meet with major donors or major prospects, make sure they have access to plenty of information from that person’s donor profile to help guide the conversation. You should always conduct research about individual donors before meeting with them in person to remind you about their interests, their past involvement, and future opportunities. 

Making the most of the limited time your nonprofit has is what matters most for personalizing conversations. Automate as much of this personalization as you can and don’t be afraid to take the time to research individuals when the opportunity presents itself. It will be worth it!

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3. Treating Donors like an ATM

54% of lapsed donors left because they could no longer afford to give.

Your donors are not ATMs. Too many nonprofits reach out to their supporters only when they need donations to help with projects and campaigns. Donors who receive too many asks for donations too frequently start feeling used. This is especially true if your supporter wants to contribute, but can’t afford to (as happens with such a large percentage of lapsed donors). 

In order to make sure your donors don’t feel like you’re simply using them for their cash, you should approach them with a variety of opportunities for engagement. 

Providing new and unique opportunities helps donors stay engaged with your nonprofit even as the economy or their personal finances fluctuate. Create a communications calendar so you can be sure to space out fundraising asks and ensure a variety of opportunities throughout the year. You may choose to include opportunities such as: 

  • Recurring donation opportunities. Instead of giving all at once, recurring donations allow supporters to give a smaller amount every month. It impacts their finances less while still resulting in the same final donation at the end of the year.
  • Encouraging volunteers. Ask your supporters to donate time rather than money. This helps your nonprofit get more done around the office or at an event and ensures the supporter still feels connected to your cause. 
  • Asking for in-kind donations. If you know your supporters have access to materials or a resource that your nonprofit could make use of, you may consider asking for an in-kind donation rather than a monetary one. 
  • Take unique fundraising approaches. Instead of just asking for straight donations, you may offer programs that make donating more approachable. For instance, Funds2Orgs’ fundraising ideas guide includes unique options like shoe drive fundraisers, raffles, penny wars, used book sales, and restaurant giving nights.

Building a relationship with your donors means making sure they know that you appreciate their support, not just their cash. Give them plenty of opportunities to show you how they can help in addition to your traditional giving pages. 

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4. Lack of Prioritization of Retention

First-time donor retention is 19%, while it is 63% for repeat donors

As we said in the beginning, building donor relationships is especially important to improve your nonprofit’s donor retention rate. One common challenge that nonprofits run into is that they simply don’t see the importance of retention. 

Organizations tend to think that they have to continuously expand and acquire new supporters in order to grow. However, if you’re not retaining these donors that you acquire over a long period of time, how can you expect to continue growing? 

The key to nonprofit growth is striking a balance between your donor retention and donor acquisition strategies. And to do this, your nonprofit should focus on the “golden donation.” This is the second donation an individual makes to your organization. After the golden donation, your supporters are 63% more likely to continue giving to your nonprofit. 

In order to prioritize donor retention, your nonprofit should be sure to: 

  • Make sure new donors feel welcome. Thank them immediately for giving to your organization and stress how grateful you are for their support. 
  • Create a complete stewardship plan. Be sure you know what strategies you’re going to use to steward donors throughout the calendar year. 
  • Be better than average. With first-time donor retention so low across the board, don’t settle for being average. Keep working to help your nonprofit advance and grow quickly. 

Make sure donor retention is one of the metrics your nonprofit keeps at the forefront of your CRM dashboard so your staff members are always thinking about it.

Your nonprofit’s priorities show through as you design your growth strategy. Make sure you’re emphasizing building relationships and improving retention as one of your top priorities. 

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5. Limited Technology

18% of lapsed donors leave due to poor service or communication

Did you notice a commonality between the above strategies? They all allow you to leverage technology in order to build your relationships. You can use technology to help communicate impact, save time, create a communications plan, and track your retention rate. 

This requires your nonprofit to have access to effective technology. Investing in a cheap solution runs the risk of it not being high enough quality to help the nonprofit grow. By cheap, we don’t mean that all inexpensive solutions are bad. Cheap quality is what your nonprofit should avoid. 

Before investing in a software solution where the price seems too good to be true, make sure you conduct your research to make sure you’ll have access to everything you need. 

If 18% of lapsed donors leave due to ineffective communication or service, the last thing you want is for your tech to limit you in these areas. Make sure your nonprofit has the capability to offer the best communication and service to your supporters. If you’re unsure of how to start looking for the best tech, check out this guide to purchasing top-notch software. 

Building donor relationships is the key to establishing effective donor retention. While there are challenges to building relationships, overcoming them will help your nonprofit continue growing and get closer to achieving your mission.

Author: Steven Shattuck

Chief Engagement Officer at Bloomerang

Steven Shattuck is Chief Engagement Officer at Bloomerang and Executive Director of Launch Cause. A prolific writer and speaker, Steven is a contributor to “Fundraising Principles and Practice: Second Edition” and volunteers his time on the Project Work Group of the Fundraising Effectiveness Project and is an AFP Center for Fundraising Innovation (CFI) committee member.

Looking at the New Year with 20/20 Vision

49309556946_7d4841c90f_wHappy New Year, everyone! Wow, it’s 2020, and I couldn’t resist the 20/20 pun. Not only are we entering a new year, we’re also entering a new decade.

Many people use the New Year to make changes and improvements in their lives. You can do the same for your nonprofit organization. 

As with personal resolutions, you want to set realistic goals that you can stick with over time. Going back to the 20/20 theme, you want to set these goals and make these plans with clear vision.

Here are a few ways to help you ensure success in 2020.

You must have fundraising and communications plans

One key to success is good planning. 

If you haven’t made fundraising and communications plans yet, do that now! Don’t go too far into the New Year without plans in place.

Take a look back at 2019 to see what worked and what didn’t in your fundraising and communications. Incorporate what you’ve learned into your 2020 plans.

Be sure to include donor engagement and donor retention in your fundraising plan.

If you didn’t have a concrete plan last year and you weren’t as successful as you would have liked, that may be why.

Write your annual fundraising plan with these 6 steps

Here’s a Sample Fundraising Plan for Your Non-Profit

Do’s and Don’ts for Your Annual Fundraising Plan

12 (Amazingly Easy) Step by Step Fundraising Plan Templates

Build a Better Nonprofit Marketing Plan: Here’s How

How to Integrate Your Nonprofit Fundraising Plan With Your Marketing Plan

Measure your progress

Make sure you evaluate your progress at least once a quarter. It will be easier to stay successful if you can continually measure your progress and make any necessary changes before it’s too late.

20 KPIs For Your Nonprofit To Track

Pay attention to your donor retention

Make this a priority. You’ll have more success if you work to keep the donors you already have instead of focusing on getting new ones.

First, if you don’t already know it, figure out your retention rate. Do this after every fundraising campaign.

A Guide to Donor Retention

If it’s low, it’s something you can fix, usually with better communication. Donor retention is a huge problem for nonprofits. Your goal should be to have donors who support you for a long time.

It’s easier and less expensive to keep your current donors than to find new ones, so, once again, make donor retention a priority.

One Thing Most Nonprofits Stink at (Donor Retention) and How You Can Change It

3 Concrete Strategies to Address The Donor Retention Crisis

Also, the New Year is a good time to get in touch with any lapsed donors, especially ones who gave a year ago. They may just need a gentle reminder. 

Emphasize monthly giving 

Staying on the retention theme, the retention rate for monthly donors is 90%. Work on starting or growing your monthly giving program so you can have a bunch of highly committed donors. A good way to start is to invite your current donors to become monthly donors.

Incorporating Monthly Giving Into Your Fundraising

How to start a monthly giving program for your small nonprofit

20 Monthly Giving Intentions for 2020

Make building relationships a priority 

You may think the most important component of fundraising is raising money. While that’s important, so is building relationships with your donors. 

It’s hard to raise money year after year if you don’t build a good relationship with your donors. Every single interaction with your donors needs to focus on building relationships. That includes fundraising appeals. It’s possible to raise money and build relationships at the same time.

Good relationships with your donors will help you with retention.

Build Relationships With Your Donors Every Step of the Way

Build Loyal Donor Relationships in 3 Easy Steps

Show some gratitude, too

A big part of building relationships is showing gratitude to your donors. Many nonprofits do a poor job with this. 

You need to start by sending a heartfelt thank you immediately after you receive a donation and then find ways to thank your donors throughout the year. Put together a thank you plan to help with this.

Nonprofit Donor Thank You’s: What are You Doing to Stand Out?

Start the New Year off by making fundraising and communications plans. Then monitor your progress, pay attention to your retention rates, and work on building relationships with your donors. 

Best of luck for a successful 2020.

How to Put Together a Communications Calendar

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In my last few posts, I’ve emphasized the importance of keeping in touch with your donors throughout the year.

Some nonprofit organizations are good at communicating with their donors, but many are not. Often the only times you hear from these organizations is when they’re asking for donations.

Raising money is only part of the fundraising equation. You also need to thank donors, keep them updated on how their gifts are helping you make a difference, and build relationships.

To do all that you need to communicate with your donors at least once or twice a month throughout the year. If that sounds impossible, it will be a whole lot easier if you put together a communications calendar (also known as an editorial calendar).

I like the term communications calendar because it emphasizes the importance of communicating with your donors and other supporters all-year-round.

Some of you may already have a communications calendar, which is great. Now is a good time to update yours for the coming year. For the rest of you, here are some suggestions to help you get started. Even though it will take a little time to put together, it will be worth it in the end because you’ll be able to do a better job of communicating with your donors.

This is not just a job for your marketing department. All departments need to work together. Figure out what information you need to share and when to share it. You want a consistent stream of information – not three emails in one day and nothing for three weeks.

As you put together your communications calendar, think about how you will use different channels and which audience(s) should receive your messages. You may only send direct mail a few times a year (and I hope you do use direct mail), but send an e-newsletter once a month and communicate by social media several times a week. You’ll often use several different channels when you send a fundraising appeal or promote an event.

Start big by looking at the entire year and then break it down by months and weeks. You’ll keep adding to your communications calendar throughout the year.

Here are some categories you can use in your communications calendar. Some items will be time-sensitive and others won’t be.

Updates

You need to keep your donors updated on how they’re helping you make a difference. Your print and e-newsletter should be included in your communications calendar. If you don’t do a newsletter, make a plan to share updates another way – maybe by postcard, email, and/or social media. Sometimes short updates are more effective.

News stories

There’s a whole lot going on in the news these days. You won’t be able to predict news stories in advance. However, if there’s a hot item in the news that’s relevant to the work you do, that could be something to share or use as an example of how you’re helping to make a difference for the people/community you serve.

Legislation

Advocacy alerts are a wonderful way to engage with your supporters. Be on the lookout for any federal or state legislation that’s relevant to your organization. Encourage people to contact their legislators about an issue or a bill. Then report back to them with any updates, and thank them for getting involved.

Time of year

Is there something going on during a particular month that’s pertinent to your organization? Perhaps it’s homelessness or foster care awareness month.

Thanksgiving, the holidays, and winter can be a difficult time for some people. How can you weave that into a good story to share with your supporters?  In addition, think of creative ways to connect at other times of the year such as Valentine’s Day, spring, and back-to-school time.

Keep in mind your organization’s anniversary doesn’t mean much to donors unless you can tie that in with how they’re helping you make a difference.

Events

Does your organization hold any events? Besides your events, are there other events in your community that would be of interest to your supporters? This is a great thing to share on social media.

Fundraising and recruitment

Be sure to add your fundraising appeals to your communications calendar. Obviously, your fundraising campaigns are important, but you also want to show gratitude and send updates during this time without inundating your donors with too many messages. Planning ahead will help you strike this balance.

If your organization has specific times it needs to recruit volunteers, add that to your calendar, as well.

Thank your donors

This is crucial! Find different ways to let your donors know how much you appreciate them. You can combine a thank you with an update. Do this at least once a month.

Ongoing content

If you’re making a difference, you have stories to tell. Share a story at least once a month. Client success stories (either in the first or third person) are best. You could also profile a board member, volunteer, donor, or staff member. Be sure to highlight what drew them to your organization.

Create a story bank to help you with this.

Keep going

As you hear about other relevant information, add it to your calendar so you can stay connected with your donors/supporters throughout the year.

Here is more information to help you create a communications/editorial calendar. A couple of these links also include templates.

How to create and use a nonprofit editorial calendar

Creating the Perfect Editorial Calendar – A Cinderella Story

How to Create a Nonprofit Editorial Calendar

EDITORIAL CALENDARS – RESOURCES FOR YOU

The Importance of Segmenting Your Donors

5786426902_1b9405e1a5_wYear-end fundraising time is here. I’ve already started receiving appeal letters and I know this is just the beginning. 

I get appeals from nonprofit organizations I don’t already support and many of these are generic and impersonal. This is annoying. But what’s even more annoying is receiving generic appeals from organizations I do support.

Maybe I’ve donated for at least five years. In many cases, I’m a monthly donor. Do these organizations recognize that? No, they don’t. I just receive a one-size-fits-all letter. 

This is a mistake. If you don’t segment your donors and send different letters to different types of donors, you’re telling them you don’t recognize them for who they are.

Do not send everyone the same letter. You don’t need to create 100 different types of letters. Four or five should be sufficient. Besides segmenting your appeal letters, you also need to segment your thank you letters. You need to segment your donor communication (newsletters, etc), too, but I’m only going to cover appeal and thank you letters in this post.

Your donors are getting tons of appeals right now, as we enter one of the busiest times of the year. Your appeal will stand out if it’s not the same old same old.

Here are a few different types of donor groups. Feel free to add more if that’s relevant. The more you can segment, the better. Investing in a good database will help you with this.

Current single gift donors

One of the biggest hurdles nonprofits face is ensuring first-time donors give a second time. If they keep giving after that, they’re showing their commitment to your organization. Don’t blow it by ignoring this.

An appeal letter to current single gift donors (Monthly donors get their own appeal. More on that below.) must acknowledge their past support. This is also good opportunity to ask for an upgrade. Many organizations don’t do this, but it’s a good way to increase your revenue. 

If these donors give again, they should get a handwritten note, phone call, or letter letting them know how much you appreciate their continued support. If they’ve upgraded their gift, acknowledge that, too.

Potential/new single gift donors

If you’re sending an appeal to someone who’s never donated to your nonprofit before, what is your connection to them? Are they volunteers, event attendees, or people on a list you just purchased?

The more you can establish a connection, the better chance you have of getting a donation.

The retention rate for first-time donors is abysmal. One of the reasons is poor communication. You can help boost your retention rate by making your new donors feel special.

New donors should get a handwritten note, phone call, or letter welcoming them as donors. Invite them to connect with you in other ways such as signing up for your newsletter, following you on social media, or volunteering.

Then a week or so later, send them a welcome packet by mail or email. Personalization is crucial with new donors.

Are We Sure An Automated Email Welcome Series For New Donors Is A Good Idea?

New monthly donors

Brand new donors who opt for monthly or other recurring donations get the same special thank you treatment mentioned above. Welcome them to your family of monthly donors. 

Current monthly donors

Your current monthly donors must get their own appeal that recognizes them as monthly donors. In this appeal, you can either ask them to upgrade their gift or give an additional year-end gift. Here’s an example from the Southern Poverty Law Center.

What’s In My Mailbox | How are you upgrading your monthly donors?

When your donors renew or upgrade their monthly gifts, they, of course, get a super fabulous thank you.

Current donors who become monthly donors

Your current donors who decide to become monthly donors are also showing their commitment to you. They get a handwritten note, phone call, or letter thanking them for their continued support and for joining your family of monthly donors. From now on they should get specialized appeals and other communication targeted to monthly donors. 

Segmenting your donors can pay off

You might be panicking because this type of segmentation sounds like extra work. But it will be worth it if you can raise additional revenue and boost your retention rate.

11 Ways To Segment Your Donors To Improve Your Fundraising

How to Effectively Segment Your Donors and Audiences 

How to Make Your Online Thanks Yous More Personal

4102985881_0c855d40d7_nMany people donate online now. There’s a good reason for this. It’s usually fast and easy, or at least it should be.

One problem with online donations is the poor thank yous that come after your donor has given you a gift. Even though your thank you landing page and thank you email are automatically generated, it doesn’t mean they need to sound like they were written by a robot.

There’s a human being on the other end and they just did something nice by donating to your organization. Don’t they deserve to be lavished with gratitude?

It’s not hard to make your online thank yous more personal. Here’s what you need to do.

Use words that convey gratitude

First, make a list of words you associate with gratitude. Did you come up with words such as transaction and processed? Because those are words I often see after I make an online gift. I want to tear my hair out every time I see transaction complete or your gift was successfully processed.

Words matter and some words of gratitude include appreciate, grateful, and of course, thank you. 

Think of the donations you receive as the start or continuation of a relationship and not a transaction. 

Make a good first impression with your thank you landing page

Your landing page is your first chance to say thank you and it’s usually about as engaging as an Amazon receipt. In fact, I’ve received online shopping receipts that are more personal than some nonprofit “thank you” landing pages.

Remember to use words that convey gratitude. You could open with Thank you, David! or You’re amazing!  Include an engaging photo or video and a short, easy to understand description of how the donation will help the people you serve.

Invite donors to connect with you in other ways such as signing up to receive your newsletter, following you on social media, and volunteering.

If you use a third-party giving site, you might be able to customize the landing page. If you can’t, follow up with a personal thank you email message within 48 hours.

Don’t let your donors think they only made a transaction.

How to Create Post Donation Thank You Pages That Delight Donors

Six Tips for a Stronger Post-Donation Thank You Landing Page

Write a thank you email that will impress your donors

Start off by thinking of a good subject line. At the very least say Thank You! and not Donation Received. Stay away from the dreaded words processed and transaction. You want your thank you email to stand out in your donor’s overflowing inbox.

Open your message with Thank You or You just did something incredible, and not the usual On Behalf of X organization. Then let your donors know how they’re helping you make a difference for the people/community you serve.

Basically, you want to follow the rules of writing a good thank you letter, the key word here being good. I covered this in my last post The Purpose of a Thank You Letter is to Thank Your Donors. It amazes me how many thank you letters/emails don’t do a good job of saying thank you.

You won’t be able to segment much, but you should be able to distinguish between single gifts and monthly donations.

Speaking of monthly donations, many organizations send their monthly donors an email acknowledgment each month. There’s nothing wrong with that, but what’s wrong is many of these are dreadfully boring and usually include the same message each month.

Your monthly donors have made a long-term commitment to you, you can show the same commitment to them by writing a better thank you email and mixing up the content by sharing updates.

You can include a donation summary or receipt with your thank you email, but that should be at the end – AFTER – you pour on the gratitude. I prefer the term donation summary because it doesn’t sound as transactional.

Again, don’t make your message sound like it was written by a robot. Write something warm and personal.

Thanking a Donor by Email: Best Practices and Examples

7 Best Practices for Donor Thank You Emails

Give your donors a good thank you experience 

Since your thank you landing page and email are automatically generated, you can’t make them as personal as a handwritten note, phone call, or letter. That’s why you need to do at least one of those for your online donors. An online thank you is not enough.

You want to give your donors a thank you experience. Your thank you landing page and email acknowledgment are just the beginning. Make them engaging and personal and keep up that theme as you continue to show gratitude to your donors throughout the year.

 

The Purpose of a Thank You Letter is to Thank Your Donors

Thank youYou would think the purpose of a thank you letter is to thank your donors, but way too many of them have barely an ounce of gratitude.

As you work on your year-end appeal, you need to spend just as much time planning how you’ll thank your donors. Thanking your donors after an appeal (and throughout the year) is equally important, yet many organizations leave this as a last-minute to-do item and it shows.

There are many ways to thank your donors after an appeal – by mail, phone, email, on your website, or a combination of those. The more you can do the better.

Thanking your donors is something you need to take seriously. Don’t shortchange your donors with a lame, generic thank you letter.

Here are a few ways to do a better job of thanking your donors.

Start planning now

Don’t wait until the day after your appeal goes out. Give yourself plenty of time to plan.

Figure out what you’ll be able to do. I highly recommend a handwritten note or phone call. Can you do that for all your donors? If not, maybe you’ll break it down by new donors, long-time donors, or donors who have given a certain amount.

At the very least, your donors should get a letter, even if they’ve donated online. Whatever you decide, get started on the content now.

Make your donor’s day with a handwritten thank you note

I love it when a nonprofit sends a handwritten thank you note. This is a rare occurrence, so if you do this, your thank you note will stand out in your donor’s mailbox.

Handwritten notes are great in many ways, but one advantage is you don’t have to write that much and it shouldn’t take too long. How to Write 3 Minute Thank You Notes

You could make thank you cards with an engaging photo or buy some nice thank you cards. Get together a team of board members, staff, and volunteers right after your appeal goes out and have a thank-you party. 

Think about how much your donors will appreciate this nice gesture. Here’s a sample note.

Dear Steve,

Thank you so much for upgrading your gift to $75. This will help us serve more families at the Parkside Community Food Bank. We’re so happy you’ve been a donor these past five years.

Phone calls are another personal way to say thank you

Calling first-time donors is known to improve retention rates. But you could also call long-term donors to make them feel special.

Again, you want to get a team together for a thankathon. This is a great thing for your board to do. You may need to do a short training first. 6 Keys to Rock Thank You Calls and Retain More Donors  Here’s a sample phone script.

Hi Linda, this is Jean Perkins and I’m a board member at Neighbors Helping Neighbors. Thank you so much for your donation of $50 and welcome to our donor family. Your gift will help us purchase winter coats for homeless children.

Write an amazing letter

If it’s impossible to send handwritten notes or make phone calls, you can still impress your donors with an amazing thank you letter. Many thank you letters aren’t amazing and are mediocre at best. You’ll have an advantage if you take some time to create a great, donor-centered letter.

Remember, thank you letters are about thanking your donor. Keep that in mind at all times.  

Don’t start your letter with On behalf of X organization…. If you’re sending it on your letterhead, it should be apparent it’s coming from your organization. Instead, start your letter with Thank you or You just did something incredible.

You also don’t need to explain what your organization does. This is usually done in a braggy way by saying something like – As you know, X organization has been doing great work in the community for 20 years…. Someone who’s donated to your organization should already be familiar with what you do.

And, don’t ask for another gift in your thank you letter. You did that in your appeal letter. Nothing diminishes that feel-good moment by being asked to give more money again so soon. Remember, you’re supposed to be thanking your donors.

Your thank you letter needs to make your donors feel good about giving to your organization. Let them know how their gift is helping you make a difference. Include a brief story or example.

As with all writing, make your letter personal and conversational. Write to the donor using you much more than we, and leave out jargon and any other language your donors won’t understand. Also, you must address your donors by name – not Dear Friend.

A few other ways to make your letter stand out are to use a colored envelope or include a teaser that says Thank You! If you can hand address the envelopes and include a handwritten note inside, that will help make it more personal. You could also include an engaging photo in the letter.

Yes, you do need to include the tax-deductible information, but do that at the end, after you impress your donors with your letter, or include it on a separate page. It’s easiest to include this with the thank you letter or email. Then you don’t have to send it again unless your donor requests it.

 5 Thank You Letters Donors Will Love

How to write a donation thank you letter

How To Write Memorable Donor Thank Yous

Free Download – Nonprofit Thank You Letter Template

With fundraising revenue and retention rates down, you can’t afford to not do a good job of thanking your donors. In my next post, I’ll share some ways to improve your online thank yous.

Photo by Marco Verch